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VMUG Northeast Event in June April 30, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in VMware blogs.
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Are you a member of the VMware User Group (VMUG)?

The VMware User Group (VMUG) is an independent, global, customer-led organization, created to maximize members’ use of VMware and partner solutions through knowledge sharing, training, collaboration, and events.

If not then join at The VMware User Group Website

The next question?

Do you live in the Northeast of England and by this I mean Newcastle, Gateshead, Sunderland etc?

The UK NorthEast England VMware User Group are hosting a meeting on Thursday 6th June 2013 from 12.30PM-17.00

Location

Simpson Room, The Castle Gate, Melbourne Street, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 2JQ

For more information and to register follow the link to the meeting flyer

 

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Using the Group Poilcy Diagnostic Tools April 30, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in Microsoft Training, Windows 2012.
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One of the courses I teach is the Microsoft Windows 2012 Installing and Configuring course, the Microsoft designation is the 20410B

In the presentation, we look at using the built in Diagnostic Tools for Group Policy Objects.

Sometimes GPOs don’t apply as expected, or they do apply, but again not as expected.

In this demonstration we look at the following diagnostic tools.

Use Gpupdate to refresh Group Policy.

Use the Gpresult cmdlet to output the results to an HTML file.

Use the Group Policy Modelling Wizard to test the policy.

The demonstration is available at the BryanQA Youtube site

Demo of Creating and Configuring Group Policy Objects April 24, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in Microsoft Training, Windows 2012.
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One of the courses I teach is the Microsoft Windows 2012 Installing and Configuring course, the Microsoft designation is the 20410B

In the presentation, we look at creating and configuring Group Policy Objects.

Group Policy allows you to control the computing environment. We can implement policies that restrict or allow users to perform tasks regardless of which machine they log on to, or we can implement policies that control computers regardless of who logins in.

 

The demonstration is available at the BryanQA Youtube site

The VMware VSA Offline Demo April 23, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in VMware Training.
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Today on the VMware Install, Config and Manage course we were looking at the VMware Storage Appliance (VSA) lesson.

On the course we cover the theory, there’s no lab in the course, I was having a bit trawl about and found a nice little offline demo that allows the delegates to have a play at installing the VSA.

The Offline demo can be found at the VMware Product site.

Not only that, but there is also a collection of training videos also available on the site

Creating Multiple Configurations For A Print Device April 22, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in Microsoft Training, Windows 2012.
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One of the courses I teach is the Microsoft Windows 2012 Installing and Configuring course, the Microsoft designation is the 20410B

In the presentation, we look at configuring multiple configurations for a single Print Device

Creating multiple configurations for a print device enables you to assign print queues to specific users or groups so that they can print high priority jobs to a printer that is being used by other users. When a print job is sent to the high priority print queue, the print server will process the job before any jobs coming from the normal priority queue.

 

The demonstration is available at the BryanQA Youtube site

Installing the Windows VMware vSphere 5.1 Client April 21, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in VMware Training.
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One of the courses I teach is the VMware vSphere: Install, Configure and Manage [5.1]

In this demonstration, we look at Lab 1 of the course, this lab demonstrates how to install the Windows VMware vSphere Client 5.1

The vSphere Client allows for management of all aspects of the VMware vSphere environment. It also provides console access to virtual machines. The vSphere Client is used to connect remotely to ESXi Hosts and vCenter systems from a supported Windows system.

The demonstration is available as a video at the BryanQA Youtube channel

Restoring Data From a Shadow Copy April 21, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in Microsoft Training, Windows 2012.
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One of the courses I teach is the Microsoft Windows 2012 Installing and Configuring course, the Microsoft designation is the 20410B

In the presentation, we look at restoring data from a Shadow Copy.

A shadow copy is a static image (or a snapshot) of a set of data, such as a file or folder. Shadow copies provide the capability to recover files and folders based on snapshots that are taken of storage drives. After a snapshot is taken, you can view and potentially restore previous versions of files and folders that existed at the time that the snapshot was taken.

 

A shadow copy does not make a complete copy of all files for each snapshot. Instead, after a snapshot is taken, Windows Server 2012 tracks changes to the drive. A specific amount of disk space is allocated for tracking the changed disk blocks. When you access a previous version of a file, some of the content might be in the current version of the file, and some might be in the snapshot.

 

By default, the changed disk blocks are stored on the same drive as the original file, but you can modify this behaviour. You can also define how much disk space is allocated for shadow copies. Multiple snapshots are retained until the allocated disk space is full, after which, older snapshots are removed to make room for new snapshots. The amount of disk space that is used by a snapshot is based on the size of disk changes between snapshots.

 

Because a snapshot is not a complete copy of files, you cannot use shadow copies as a replacement for traditional backups. If the disk containing a drive is lost or damaged, then the snapshots of that drive are also lost.

 

Shadow copies are suitable for recovering data files, but not for more complex data (such as databases), that need to be logically consistent before a backup is performed. A database that is restored from previous versions is likely to be corrupt and require database repairs.

 

The demonstration is available at the BryanQA Youtube site

Creating a Share with Windows Server 2012 April 21, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in Microsoft Training, Windows 2012.
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One of the courses I teach is the Microsoft Windows 2012 Installing and Configuring course, the Microsoft designation is the 20410B

In the presentation, we look at sharing folders in Microsoft Windows Server 2012.

Shared folders are a key component to granting access to files on your server from the network. When you share a folder, the folder and all of its contents are made available to multiple users simultaneously over the network. Shared folders maintain a separate set of permissions from the NTFS permissions, which apply to the folder’s contents. These permissions are used to provide an extra level of security for files and folders that are made available on the network.

 

The demonstration is available at the BryanQA Youtube site

Creating a Storage Pool in Windows Server 2012 April 21, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in Microsoft Training, Windows 2012.
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One of the courses I teach is the Microsoft Windows 2012 Installing and Configuring course, the Microsoft designation is the 20410B

In the presentation, we look at creating Storage Pools in Windows Server 2012.

A storage pool is a collection of one or more physical disks that you can use to create virtual disks. You can add to a storage pool any available physical disk that is not formatted or attached to another storage pool.

 

Virtual Disk Configuration Options

 

You can create virtual disks from storage pools. If your storage pool contains more than one disk, you can also create redundant virtual disks. To configure virtual disks or Storage Spaces in Server Manager or Windows PowerShell, you need to consider the following features and their redundancy functionalities.

 

Storage Layout

 

This feature defines the number of disks from the storage pool that are allocated. Valid options include:

 

Simple. A simple space has data striping but no redundancy. In data striping, logically sequential data is segmented across all disks in a way that access to these sequential segments can be made to different physical storage drives. Striping makes it possible to access multiple segments of data concurrently. Do not host important data on a simple volume, because it provides no failover capabilities when the disk that is storing the data fails.

 

Two-way and three-way mirrors. Mirror spaces maintain two or three copies of the data that they host (two data copies for two-way mirrors and three data copies for three-way mirrors). Duplication happens with every write to ensure that all data copies are always current. Mirror spaces also stripe the data across multiple physical drives. Mirror spaces provide the benefit of greater data throughput and lower access latency. They also do not introduce a risk of corrupting at-rest data, and do not require the extra journaling stage when writing data.

 

Parity. A parity space is similar to RAID 5. Data, along with parity information, is striped across multiple physical drives. Parity enables Storage Spaces to continue to service read and write requests even when a drive has failed. Parity is always rotated across available disks to enable I/O optimization. Storage spaces require a minimum of three physical drives for parity spaces. Parity spaces have increased resiliency through journaling.

 

The demonstration is available at the BryanQA Youtube site

Creating Mount Points and Links in Microsoft Windows Server 2012 April 18, 2013

Posted by vbry21 in Microsoft Training, Windows 2012.
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One of the courses I teach is the Microsoft Windows 2012 Installing and Configuring course, the Microsoft designation is the 20410B

In the presentation, we look at configuring Mount Points and Links.

Mount Points

 

Mount points are used in Windows operating systems to make a portion of a disk or the entire disk useable by the operating system. Most commonly, mount points are associated with drive-letter mappings so that the operating system can gain access to the disk through the drive letter.

 

Since the Windows 2000 Server was first introduced, you have been able to enable volume mount points, which you can then use to mount a hard disk to an empty folder that is located on another drive. For example, if you add a new hard disk to a server, rather than mounting the drive using a drive letter, you can assign a folder name such as C:\datadrive to the drive. When you do this, any time you access the C:\datadrive folder, you are actually accessing the new hard disk.

 

Volume mount points can be useful in the following scenarios:

 

If you are running out of drive space on a server and you want to add disk space without modifying the folder structure. You can add the hard disk, and configure a folder to point to the hard disk.

 

If you are running out of available letters to assign to partitions or volumes. If you have several hard disks that are attached to the server, you may run out of available letters in the alphabet to which to assign drive letters. By using a volume mount point, you can add additional partitions or volumes without using more drive letters.

 

If you need to separate disk input/output (I/O) within a folder structure. For example, if you are using an application that requires a specific file structure, but which uses the hard disks extensively, you can separate the disk I/O by creating a volume mount point within the folder structure.

 

Links

 

A link is a special type of file that contains a reference to another file or directory in the form of an absolute or relative path. Windows supports the following two types of links:

 

A symbolic file link (also known as a soft link)

A symbolic directory link (also known as a directory junction)

 

A link that is stored on a server share could refer back to a directory on a client that is not actually accessible from the server where the link is stored. Because the link processing is done from the client, the link would work correctly to access the client, even though the server cannot access the client.

Links operate transparently. Applications that read or write to files that are named by a link behave as if they are operating directly on the target file. For example, you can use a symbolic link to link to a Hyper-

V parent virtual hard disk file (.vhd) from another location. Hyper-V uses the link to work with the parent virtual hard disk (VHD) as it would the original file. The benefit of using symbolic links is that you do not need to modify the properties of your differencing VHD.

 

Links are sometimes easier to manage than mount points. Mount points force you to place the files on the root of the volumes, whereas with links you can be more flexible with where you save files.

 

You can create links by using the mklink.exe command-line tool.

 

The demonstration is available at the BryanQA Youtube site